Author Topic: Uncommon New Haven Wall Clock  (Read 432 times)

Larry

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Uncommon New Haven Wall Clock
« on: December 22, 2019, 11:03:52 AM »
This morning I brought home a filthy New Haven manual start electric wall clock from the flea market.  On the tag on the back, there is a "Style" of "NH 611  53 T".  The clock was rather cheaply made.  The case is steel.  The front section appears to be chrome plated with most of it painted ivory.  The back section is all painted.  The dial is paper which is glued to a steel plate, and that was held to the front plate of the movement with two tiny rivets.  I managed to drill out the rivets so that I could remove the dial.  The hands appear to be chrome plated.  There is no second hand.  The power cord was crumbling rubber over cloth, so I would expect that that would place this clock in the mid-late 1930s.

I have done some searching online but have not found a single mention of this clock model.  Can someone here point me to some information and/or pictures of this model or similar models?  I am attaching some pictures of the clock as I disassembled it this morning.

Thank You


Larry
 


Duncan

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Re: Uncommon New Haven Wall Clock
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2020, 01:33:15 PM »
Larry,

Since no one has responded to our questions, maybe we can help each other?  Coincidentally, your motor is similar to the one I was asking about in my question.  I can't tell whether your rotor wheel is fixed on a rod (like mine is) or whether it is on a pivot on the bridge...but they sure look similar!  I'm guessing the little pin wheel was visible through the front of the clock so you could see that it was actually running!  My clock is a tambour style clock with a strike function that dates from probably the early 1930's.  Yours looks like an attempt to mimic the design of the Westclox Style 5 Big Ben that was the streamline design of Henry Dreyfus.   If so, the Westclox came out in Sep 1939 and continued in production until 1949.  That would put your clock in the early 1940s just before WWII started.  But why would they use such an older motor design?  So, it may be that I am all wet, and that the clock is older and might be 1930-1935? 

I hope my guessing might prompt someone to answer your question.  I have not been able to post photos taken by my phone...perhaps the files are too big?  Anyway, I will try again so you can (possibly) see my motor set up.

Best regards,

Duncan

Larry

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Re: Uncommon New Haven Wall Clock
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2020, 07:27:21 PM »
I have had an awful time with this clock.  Painting the case didn't go very well, and the gear which is part of the minute hand shaft cracked, allowing the clutch to slide.  I think that I managed to put the gear back where it was and hold it in place with super glue.  Also, one of the screw parts which was welded to the front half of the case broke off, so I have been trying to put it back with generous amounts of super glue.  The rotor in this clock fits over the post which is fixed to the bridge piece.  On the front side, it is held by copper spring.  I think that I have the movement cleaned well and lightly oiled, but the movement is very tricky to start.  This was obviously a low-end product.

I was hoping to try to reassemble the clock tonight (after giving the glue a couple of days to cure), so I might be posting another picture or two tomorrow if all goes well.


Larry

Duncan

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Re: Uncommon New Haven Wall Clock
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2020, 02:15:28 PM »
Larry,

Well, we are both having some "fun".  Your description of the rotor mechanism is the same as mine...a long thin post which is pinned to the bridge...the rotor wheel fits over that post and spins on it.  On mine, there are four small steel spacing washers under the rotor.  I agree, these are tricky to start. I think by the time your clock was built they were using an old design and maybe getting rid of stock?

On the paint job, for what it is worth, I always strip a clock like this down to bare metal, then treat with a Dupont grease remover to get all trace of oils off the metal.  I then spray with a primer, and allow to dry for about 72 hours.  I then spray with the chosen top coat...my best luck is with automotive products which are made to go over metal.  Plus there are many small spray cans of touch up available in a variety of colors to match the original.  Patience!  I have actually painted one clock I own 4 times before I got it right, so you are not alone with paint problems.  If it does not work, strip it down to the metal and start again. Victory goes to those that persevere!!

As for the wheels, if they do not go together right, check into spares on line.  If none are available, our NAWCC chapter had a good presentation on a library in South Jersey that runs a 3D printer.  It was amazing to see what a 3D printer could reproduce. 

Best of luck, and I will look forward to photos if you decide to put some up!

Duncan

Larry

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Re: Uncommon New Haven Wall Clock
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2020, 06:40:48 AM »
There were no washers by my rotor.  I usually lose them when there are.  I did reassemble the clock Sat. night, and I hung it on the kitchen wall.  It could be worse.  I am attaching a poorly exposed picture.  There is seldom enough light in the kitchen for good photos.

Larry

19and41

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Re: Uncommon New Haven Wall Clock
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2020, 02:45:02 PM »
It looks mighty nice to me.  I have only 1 New Haven, a wind up auto clock excised from a '52 or '53 Chevrolet. It taught me the value of minimal lubrication to the movement.

 

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